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  1. 1. Stoodi 2020
    Look at ____ shoes. They’re fantastic.   
  2. 2. Stoodi 2020
    What is ______ in your mother’s hand? I don’t know. I can’t see from here.   
  3. 3. Stoodi 2020
    Sudan's Jabal Maragha: Illegal gold diggers destroy ancient site Illegal gold diggers have destroyed a 2,000-year-old archaeological site in Sudan in the eastern region of the Sahara desert, official say. The Jabal Maragha site, which dates from the Meroitic period between 350 BC and 350 AD, is said to have either been a small settlement or a checkpoint. Officials from Sudan's antiquities and museums department said when they visited the site, some 270km (170 miles) north of the capital Khartoum, last month they found two mechanical diggers and five men at work. They had excavated a vast trench about 17 metres (55 feet) deep, and 20 metres long. "They had only one goal in digging here - to find gold... they did something crazy; to save time, they used heavy machinery," a shocked archaeologist Habab Idriss Ahmed, who has worked at the historic location since 1999, told the AFP news agency. Sudan is home to hundreds of pyramids and other ancient sites, although they are not as well known as those in its northern neighbour, Egypt. Sudan's archaeologists warned that the destruction was not unique but part of a growing problem. At Sai, a 12km-long river island in the Nile, hundreds of graves, some dating back to the times of the pharaohs, have been raided and destroyed by looters. "Out of a thousand more or less well-known sites in Sudan, at least a hundred have been destroyed or damaged," said Hatem al-Nour, Sudan's director of antiquities and museums. He added that the lack of security at the sites made them easy targets for looters. Enforcement of laws is also not stringent - the diggers who destroyed the Jabal Maragha, were freed without charge. It is not clear why. "They should have been put in jail and their machines confiscated. There are laws," said Mahmoud al-Tayeb, a former expert from Sudan's antiquities department. One of the long-term strategies to protect the historical sites is to teach young people about Sudanese history, so that they can cherish their heritage, Prof Habbab Idris Muhammad, the chief inspector at the antiquities and museums department told the Suna news agency. fonte: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-53889663 Questão In “Sudan is home to hundreds of pyramids and other ancient sites, although they are not as well known as those in its northern neighbour, Egypt.”, those refers to:
  4. 4. FATEC 2012
    PSYCHOLOGY OF MONEY Want Happiness? Don’t Buy More Stuff — Go on Vacation. When it comes to spending money on things or experiences, the research is clear: doing brings more happiness than owning. By Gary Belsky & Tom Gilovich | July 21, 2011 Given that it’s vacation season for many folks, we thought it a good time to devote this Mind Over Money post to a brief discussion of what personal finance is ultimately all about. Some people, of course, really enjoy counting their money, deriving great satisfaction simply from watching their bottom line grow, often quite removed from any thought of what they might do with their riches. But for most of us, money is just a token for what we can do with it — pay the mortgage or rent, send kids to college, buy a TV or travel to Italy. And for nearly all of us, money is finite; there isn’t enough to do all we want, so we must be selective. That raises a crucial question: if we want to maximize the happiness or satisfaction we get from our money, how should we spend it? There’s been a lot of recent research on this subject, much of it conducted at Tom’s home institution, Cornell University. And the answer is clear. If you’re conflicted about whether to spend money on a material good (say, a computer) or personal experience (say, a vacation), the research says you’ll get much more satisfaction — and for longer — if you choose the experience. Most of us, it turns out, get more bang from the experiential buck. Indeed, when people are asked to recall their most significant material and experiential purchases over the previous five years, they report that the experience brought more joy, was a source of more enduring satisfaction and was more clearly “money well spent¨. This might seem counter-intuitive. After all, when faced with a trade-off between doing and buying, many people opt for the material good because “it will still be there” long after the experience would have been enjoyed. In one sense that’s correct: The material good lasts while the experience is fleeting. But psychologically it’s the reverse. We quickly adapt to the material good, but the experience endures in the memories we cherish, the stories we tell and the very sense of who we are. (http://moneyland.time.com Acesso em 25/08/2011. Adaptado.)   No primeiro parágrafo do texto, o pronome demonstrativo this empregado em — this Mind Over Money post — refere-se a 
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